Posted tagged ‘ducklings’

Oh Dallas, My Dallas

June 19, 2012

With the return of the television show Dallas, the city that everyone loves to hate is back.

But my Dallas,

Sunset at White Rock Lake, Dallas, Texas

the city where I lived for 16 years,

Harry S. Moss Park, Dallas

is a very different place.

Grackle in Dallas, Texas

I’ll be spending the month of July 2012 in Dallas, where my new play, NYC Coyote Existential, is being produced by Echo Theatre as part of the Festival of Independent Theaters.The Festival takes place at one of my favorite Dallas haunts, the Bath House Cultural Center at White Rock Lake.  When I visited in early May for casting, a cormorant perched atop a piling in front of a hazy skyline.

Somewhere in the large park, coyotes prowled or waited for dusk. I didn’t see coyotes – although we looked. But I talked to people who have seen them or heard them calling.

My sightings were mostly of water birds, which abound around White Rock Lake.

Near the shoreline, ducklings massed,

geese waddled,

wood ducks glided,

herons and egrets fished,

a blackbird vied with a flock of tiny ducklings for bits of bread,

and a mama mallard nested right by the path to the water.

The next day, in Harry S. Moss Park, a few miles north of the Lake, a lovely fox squirrel kept an eye on me.

 I strolled the paths and the edge of the prairie.

Behind me was Royal Lane.

But there were better things to look at than the roadway.

Like a prairie with a distant cityscape.

I’ll be posting more from Dallas in July. See you then, little fox squirrel!

Fresh Ducklings and Growing Goslings in Morningside Park

June 3, 2010

On the move

Nine fresh-hatched ducklings, the adorable consequences of April’s disturbing displays of duck sexuality, are eagerly exploring the little pond  in Morningside Park.

Turtles, too, are out in force in today’s heat, basking and swimming.

Soaking up the sun

Lolling in the water

These are red-eared sliders, a non-native species that used to be sold for a dime or a quarter in Woolworth’s.  Who knew, in those benighted days, that the adorable inch-long hatchlings could live up to 35 years and grow to more than a foot in length?

So what happened when they outgrew the ubiquitous little plastic bowls with the miniature palm tree in the middle? Well, many were dumped in park ponds all over the city, where their descendants are thriving.

Morningside Pond is home to several turtle species, including flesh-eating snapping turtles. Here’s hoping the snappers steer clear of the succulent little morsels that make up the duckling flotilla.

The duck babies are truly tiny.  Compare this little fellow to a floating pigeon feather:

or these siblings to blades of grass:

But they’ll grow swiftly. Just a few weeks ago, the gosling quartet looked very much like the duckling nonet:

First day goslings

Then they grew just a little

until they started losing their yellow baby markings

With wings like flippers, she's going nowhere fast

and became today’s ungainly prehistoric beasties

Gawky pre-teen

They appear to be starting to molt, losing their downy fluff in preparation for actual feathers. I was surprised to see the neon-bright, sky-blue patch on their still-ineffectual wings. You can just make it out in the photos.

The awkward age

The goslings’ necks are starting to lengthen, too. Maybe one day, they’ll be worthy of Bird Neck Appreciation Day, just like their parents.

No gosling strays far from this beady eye


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